Archivos del mes: 24 noviembre 2013

2013 Smart City Expo Congress Highlights

http://www.smartcityexpo.com/en/blog

19 Nov.

  • Pedro Paulo Carvalho: La democracia representativa se está acabando, hemos de trabajar para una polistecnocracia.
  •  Kent Larson: Cities should support diversity, density and identity.
  •  Jenaro García: the data is essential as the water for the Human being of today.
  •  Iemke Idsingh: citizens exploit the cloud to connect.
  •  Paul Doherty: big data is too old fashioned, now is about infinite data.
  •  Kevin Asthon: we need to see the information as another infrastructure of the city.
  •  Brenna Berman: data don’t have borders; the residents of Chicago are connecting with the world.
  •  Manuel Valdés: One of the keypoints of the Protocol City must be resilience, a form of cooperation among cities.
  •  Dan Lewis: Urban Resilience Insitute acts as a global hub for innovation, learning, policy guidance and dissemination of the best practice and information on resilience.
  •  Ignacio Valero: In some scenarios thinking about the urban habitat in terms of resilience is a way of human happiness.
  •  Andrew Smyth: data and monitoring of infrastructure is a key to managing risk.
  •  Luis Fernando Arboleda: We must find smart territories through technology.
  •  Ross Hudson: London¿s capabilities for smart growth: business model innovation and finance, academic strength, emerging smart city clusters, good connectivity.
  •  Nobuya Suzuki: Smart city is not only created with smart infrastructures, we need to consider the people that live in them.
  •  Gil Soto Tolosa: To be effective light operators have to be able to manage points of light and make sure that it doesn¿t consume more light than necessary.
  •  Alistair Buchanan: For 25 years there was no incentive for research and development of power regulation.
  • Dan Parham: You have to legitimately engage citizens and the way to do it is collaboration.
  • Hanna Niemi-Hugaerts: Digital tools help us connect with our physical environment
  • Dante Riccie: Expand engagement to new actors and stakeholders, but also empower citizens with open data they can use.
  • Patrizia Di Monte: Vacant spaces as an opportunity to turn them into spaces for public engagement.
  • Larry Ng Lye Hock: The challenge for me is: how to maintain a sustainable and livable environment.
  • Sylvie Spalmacin-Roma: data is the next natural resource, but it is still collected in silos and it needs to be shared horizontally.
  • Nicholas Brooke: We have to make a strong campaing to change ¿me¿ to ¿us¿.
  • Amithabh Kant: the key is how to use the technology for people.
  • Melanie Nutter: Cities generate 75% of the world CO2 emissions
  • Pieter van Heyningen: Smart City is a developed world concept, for Africa is different.
  • Lucy Bullivant: We need to feel that sustainability is possible.
  • Maria Aiolova: It is necessary to work with living matter to build smart infrastructures
  • Adel Ebeid: Social innovation is where startups and social entrepreneurs become an extension of city government.
  • Tao Chen: Smart cities are not about knowledge, internet of things or big data, they are related to citizens.
  • Hiroki Iwasa: My hometown was hit by the tsunami and lost 4% of its population.
  • Juan Pablo Espinosa: A smart city has to be a socially innovative city.
  • Yasou Utsumi: Environmental security, disaster prevention and the elderly, are some of our main fields.
  • Robert Mainguy: Six security challenges for cities: Multi Agency Coordination, Citizen service, Crisis management, Large events, Ubiquitous convergence & Economic development
  • Carlos Gadsden: Thinking about what smart means before being a smart city.
  • Carlos Moreno: We need to think together towards risk.
  • Juan Carlos Escobar: Good quality of life is the main goal for our project to promoting a dynamic, technological and creative city.
  • Mirella Marrazzo: Integrated planning is an important idea to make all policies speak together in a comprehensive way.
  • Caterina Sarfatti: Doubts and resistance are normal in city departments because sectorial departments see smart city projects as private projects from companies, this is why an integral approach has to deal with these fears and barriers.
  • Wolfgang Loibl: We need energy efficient and intelligent buildings.
  • Leonardo Benitez Diez:  The evolution of traditional grids and cities into smart grids and cities, feeding each other.
  • Marcel Macarulla: Switch off the standby mode and you will reduce a 6% of the energy consumption of a building (the model building of the project).
  • Lara Pérez:  Business intelligent model: transform data into understandable information.
  • Carlos Merino: Hydrogen: one of the main actors related to energy storage.
  • Roi Chiti: The city as the main game field for the sustainable development.
  • Daniel Ortiz: Estamos repensando el modo de hacer, fundamentalmente el  modo de gobernar.
  • Ximena Nuñez: El gran desafío es lograr que en nuestro territorio podamos llegar  a construir, una ciudad con diseño sostenible e integrado a escala  natural y humana.
  • Lluis Cases:  Es un momento de cambio y nuevo enfoque en la prestación de los servicios, en cuestiones administrativas, de empleo público.
  • Concepción Gamarra: El escenario en el que todos jugamos lo determinante es la rapidez y el rápido será el más competitivo.
  • Carles Conill: El agua es un derecho, por lo tanto hemos creído que la administración tenía la obligación de garantizar el derecho al gua y regular su gestión.
  • Joan Carles Sánchez: La gestión de las bases de datos es un tema de mucha preocupación. Hay que garantizar los principios de privacidad de los ciudadanos.
  • Íñigo de la Serna: En las ciudades debe existir un modelo de negocio. Se está autocreando el mercado. Y las empresas tienen que aprovechar las oportunidades en función de las necesidades de las administraciones.
  • Antoni Brey Rodriguez: IoT is like solar energy, there is a lot of energy but you need technology to collect it, use it, and make money out of it, it is the same with information.
  • Keping Zhang: at Wuxi they consider IoT as a tool for city transformation, oriented to services, transport, sustainability, the big deal is how to make it a service for citizens.
  • Eric Dresselhuys:  People are putting great amounts of energy into reinventing things that are already working, the key is to use one application that works well and work with that one. Feel fast, if you try it and it doesn’t work do the next, but find the first application.
  • Kevin Ashton: When I am asked if the IoT is real, I always say, look at China, ther the IoT is real, it is happening and it has been happening for a while.
 20 Nov.
  • Richard Florida: The basic force behind growth is the clustering of people and technology together as an urban metabolism = the city. It is about megaregions such as Barcelona-Lyon / Amsterdam · Brussels · Antwerp; about functioning megaregions , A great functioning megaregion needs to be a Technology leader, promote Talent and be Tolerant. It is now about Quality of place not Quality of life. The city spurs innovation by serendipity.
  •  Antoni Vives:It¿s time to promote a human development specifically designed for cities.
  •  Pedro Paulo Carvalho: Para construir una ciudad smart primero tenemos que entrenar a nuestros lideres en temas de gestión para el futuro.
  •  Charbel Aoun: It¿s not only about technology, it¿s not only about data.  It¿s about every aspect of the city.
  •  Laura Ipsen: The real opportunity that we have today is the construction of the digital architecture of the future.
  •  Mike Lake: Identify challenges, explore solutions, share experiences, all of these is important to develop smart cities.
  •  Valmir Fachini:  Integrated biosystems try to imitate nature: energy generation through biomass disposal.
  •  Eduardo Fernández: We have to be prepared to convert disposal into resources.
  •  Ignacio Arespacochaga Maroto:  It¿s better to give a bonus to citizens in order to improve their environmental behaviour.
  •  Assumpta Faiña: Waste is a twofold challenge in cities: from homes to wasteland and, sometimes less considered, from source to homes.
  •  Eric Woods: Our cities need to use big data in order to manage cities accurately according to the complex challenges we face today in the information age.
  •  Guy Danon: Good governance, user empowerment, community engagement, service information and urban resilience are the main urban pillars today to drive innovation.
  •  Jordi Marin & Pablo Vázquez: The pulse of the city is basic information that has to be converted into meaningful knowledge to take decisions.
  •  Hans Viehmann: Big data is, mostly, location information, such as where is something, how do I get somewhere, or today I am at…
  •  Jarmo Eskelinen: Like the Wikipedia, citizens can also built something big.
  •  Pedro Vidal Matamala: Nuestro primer paso, el más importante, es dar una mirada smart al interior de nuestra organización.
  •  Liliana Jaimes: Buscamos crear una ciudad donde todo se encuentre integrado.
  •  Jong Sung Hwang: Smart City means city as a platform.
  •  Víctor Rico: Las ciudades son motor del desarrollo pero también han aumentado las desigualdades sociales.
  • Alexandra Vogl: We have to think global but be a smart local mobile, geo-spatial, and web 2.0 can help save money, reach citizens more effectively, and deliver better public services.
  •  Colette Maloney: we need to integrate informatics, energy and ICT to improve our live in cities.
  •  Magdalena Andrea Strachinescu: The idea is to find innovative solutions that we can transfer to other cities.
  •  Juanjo Hierro: For smartcities we need technology and open innovation ecosystems.
  •  Steve Turner: Manchester will be a showcase to the world of how to deliver strong economic growth and create a comfortable place to live, through a sustainable model.
  •  Steffen Rasmussen: The way we learn it¿s very important for the way how we implant smart solutions.
  •  Laszlo Bax: Simple ICT system can facilitate a choice of an optimal energy tariff
  •  Luis Reis: The path to design a real time managing plan: define indicators, integrate systems, incorporate externalities and involve users.
  •  Antonio Marques: The challenge now is how to manage information to create social value so as to save energy.
  •  Nicholas Brooke: Science park is poised to assume a central position in strengthening Hong Kon´s green culture.
  •  Miguel Veríssimo: Using state of the art technologies you can design sustainable and smart cities.
  •  Camilo Valdivia: Smart cities approach to (in)formal urban growth.
  •  Stig L. Andersson: We must use nature¿s processes to enhance our cities.
  •  Lluís Domènech: he most interesting projects developed with sustainability criteria and high technological standards are becoming models for transforming our cities.
  •  Sergio Jerez: Opening data is not about being modern or fancy, it is about a new raw material for society and the need of more efficient services.
  •  Annette Holm: Regulations can serve as an enabler of barriers for ICT deployment a digital society extension.
  •  Brenna Berman: Data updating cannot depend on a manual routine, it won¿t be effective. Maintaining it as automatically as possible is the main suggestion we can share.
  •  Jarmo Eskelinen: Internet is about scale and critical mass, how can these characteristics be replicated in cities’ nature?
  •  Frank Kresen: We are stressing the benefits of technologies, but citizens do not trust them.
  •  Jan Anneerstedt: Social activism has also been vital to imagine the way forward for 2020 and reformulate the city of Stockholm.
  •  Matts lager: It is essential the long-term cooperation between the public and private sectors.
  •  Emilio Fernández: A smart city is when services are offered intelligently improving the quality
  •  Volker Buscher: Do cities want to be leaders or followers?
  •  Francesc Robusté: So far we have shown that we can be smart without too much technology, now we have to prove we can be smart with technology.
  •  Jean Louis Fiorucci: It¿s required an overview of mobility where traffic, transport, parking and people are connected concepts.
  •  Maria Serrano we can identify three trends in mobility: Mobility Cooperative, Smart urban furniture and Smart Mobility more social.
  •  Anthony Townsend: Open data, cheap cell phones, wifi can be pro-poor technologies for inclusion, but used in different ways from a civic hacking perspective.
  •  Abha Joshi-Ghani: Participatory budgeting can now be fostered thanks to mobile technologies far more easily today than what it was years ago
  •  Jong Sung Hwang: Smart city projects can be different in approach. Open and close networks are options that normally go together depending on our needs.
  •  Peter Madden: Innovate collaboratively. No single organisation can tackle all the challenges of cities on their own.
  •  Fernando Rayon: The challenge is to amplify the ability to create new products for consumers and collaborate with other institutions.
  •  Iñigo de la Serna: Participatory sensing with mobile tools is enhancing citizen reporting and making it easier for public services to have better information of issues on streets and public spaces.
  •  Alfonso Govela: Linking youth, technology and cities is a way to hear the sound of the city.
  •  Norihiro Hagita: Field experimentations of robotic solutions at schools, shopping centres, health centers,…have become more and more usual and there is a reliable knowledge on these experiences.
  •  David Johera: Creating scalable models is the only way to approach urban infrastructures integration instead of building one final platform from the start.
  •  Zvica Popper: When designing a new service, system or product you have two alternatives: society driven innovation and technology driven innovation.
  •  Eddie Bet Hazvadi: The cities are for the people who inhabit them. We believe that if a city cannot satisfy the needs of its inhabitants will not have good results. This approach requires holistic solutions.
  •  Yanjing Wang: We want to create a market environment for technological aplications were smart solucions can be developed.
  •  Oisín Quinn: Cities cannot wait for people to adapt to them, it must be the other way around: the city has to adapt to the people.
  •  Carlos Negreira Souto: El ciudadano no puede estar al margen de los cambios que están ocurriendo.
  •  Joanna Williams: It¿s necessary to use a mixed kind of policies in order to become a zero carbon city.
  •  Thomas Rau: We have to produce and to consume in a completely different way.
  •  Kurt Emil Eriksen: An active house creates healthier and more comfortable indoor conditions for its occupants.
  •  Mihaela Thuring: Urban living lab concept: urban transition lab; urban citizen lab; urban learning lab.
  •  Eric-Mark Huitema: Globalization has changed the economic playing field, but hasn’t leveled population growth in cities.
  •  Guillermo Fernández: Queremos fomentar que las personas dejen sus coches en casa y se deplacen a pie.
  •  Roman Gaus: There are a few big megatrends we are going to see in the next few years: food safety, traceability of food, consumer demand, urbanization, retail innovation, or food security. We know 20% of fresh produce consumed in the city could and should come from the city.
  •  Ben Flanner  -Stormwater capture and energy insulation are the two main reasons for rooftop gardening, and it has a triple bottom-line: income, environmental benefits, and community benefits.
  •  Pam Warhurst – We are using the power of food to change the way we live, converting our city center into the center of an edible revolution, bringing pride back to cities and their citizens.
  •  Pablo Sánchez Chillón: La red española de ciudades inteligentes ha hecho hasta la actualidad un buen trabajo pero tiene tres retos: 1) bajar los proyectos a la ciudad real de forma escalable, 2) situar el discurso más allá de la élite vinculando a la ciudadanía y 3) mejorar la comunicación del trabajo realizado, un modelo exportable.
  •  José Vicente Valdenebro: El problema de las ciudades es que antes de la creación de la red hemos trabajado de forma vertical. Actualmente somos capaces de aprender de los demás.
  •  Beatriz Simon: La red española de ciudades inteligentes se formula desde un punto de vista muy aristotélico, es decir práctico.
  •  Ángel Ibáñez Hernando: Otro reto de la red española de ciudades inteligentes debe ser la propia formalización del concepto de ciudad inteligente más allá del marketing y sacarle las cargas de rechazo (por la connotación pretenciosa o cursi del vocablo) de parte de la población.
  •  Iñigo de la Serna:  El reto más importante de la red española de ciudades inteligentes es generar proyectos conjuntos, facilitar la regulación y promover la colaboración público-privada

21 Nov.

  • Amory Lovins: We can keep demand (of energy) dropping by exaggerating existing trends. Integrative design is based in retrofitting, remanufacturing, i.e. changing windows or pipes. Global markets are shifting to distributed renewables (wind, solar, geothermal & biomass or biogas).We humans are creating a new fire, not scarce, not local, permanent, free & flameless. We have to be more efficient, in the same way how we grow.
  • Mohinder Singh: The transport system has to be inclusive.
  • David L. Bragdon: Transportation planning is indivisible from community planning.
  •  Dario Hidalgo: If you try to solve congestion building more and more roads, it is like trying to solve your overweight by making your pants bigger.
  •  Owen Poole:  If you give information to the citizens, you are giving them choices.
  •  Alejandro Pérez Candela: We have the tools to make possible the dialogue between governments and citizens.
  •  Jorge Estévez San Román: Elevators, they consume energy, but they can also produce energy, the question is how to supply it to the grid.
  •  Ivan Jaques: Cities have to learn what is not working, it is even more important than to learn what has worked.
  •  Jørgen Abildgaard: Implementing a climate action plan is also a training process.
  •  Derek Morgan: We have to be more collaborative, involving people from the beginning of our intervention.
  •  Shannon Lawrence: Dealing with the private sector is a challenge for municipalities.
  •  Sebastian Martin Scholz: Rapid urbanization, particularly in developing countries, presents one of the biggest development challenges of this century.
  •  Veronique Lamblin: Digital tools mean the main transformation for the auto industry since its foundation, adding new virtual services but also physical transformation for the whole transport system.
  •  Albert Remke: Citizen’s science tries to include citizens in experiments, measurements and observations in research and development activities because there are so many people in the world available and prepared thanks to digital technologies, and to act as sensors to provide information.
  •  Adam White: In the context of mobile technologies, the mobile phone can make a difference. Government policies and a community of technologists and activists are matched together to explore opportunities to upgrade the transport system in the city.
  •   Enric Bono i Sandiumenge: La gestión del cambio viene desde el ciudadano, por eso queremos involucrarlo con la tecnología.
  •  Giorgio Prister: It’s all about identifying and understanding the needs of our citizens.
  •  Mario Andrés Meoni: En nuestra ciudad, toda la información que tenemos es democrática, todos tienen acceso a ella, no tenemos secretos para nuestros ciudadanos.
  •  Javier Sesma: Cities have grown around the use of car. By 2050 urban population will exceed 6 billion. Smart Cities shall address urban population challenges through integrated and smart public transportation.
  • Dario Hidalgo: Para enfrentar el problema de la congestión debemos cambiar el paradigma, no se trata de movilizar coches, se trata de movilizar personas.
  • Keiichiro Nakanishi: Part of our total solution in transport is to use the energy in the most effective way.
  • Kristin Barbey: Low carbon cities: nature development, urban restructuring, and energy transformation.
  • Jayesh Ranjan: Policy making is guided by a set of principles instead of being a matter of expediency, populism or tokenism.
  • Fran de Sárraga: Savings with owned funds, savings without investments, investments without owned funds: three ways to fund and implement projects that reduce energy consumption.
  • Chris Benardis: Contribution to smarter cities beyond today¿s perception of mobility.
  • Christian Tordo: We want to estimate what the internet can provide for people, growth, welfare or sustainability.
  • Anne Lane: We had to create a strong ecosystem to transform the vision into reality. Internet of things makes this possible.
  • Mateo Crespi: In this context of crisis, we need to ensure that the investment we make has a return. Now with smart meters there is a combination of values: infrastructure and value for customers.
  • Sergio Álvarez: Some people say that data is the new oil. I don’t think the data should be the new oil I want to create a culture of data; we do not have the same problems or conflicts generated by the oil.
  • Manel Sanromà: Now is the time to move on to projects that have impact on the city. We already experienced a lot, and it’s time to do business.
  • Ilmar Reepalu: When promoting a change in the city: Creativity and to try to find a common vision where citizens, universities or companies are involved is vital.
  • Sylvie Spalmacin: Regeneration is to use natural resources information. Predicting the long-term future to provide a service to citizens. The technology is translated into action to improve the citizens¿ way of life.
  • Monica Fein: Major challenges for the city of Rosario: 1) Governance 2) Operational integration 3) Corporate Citizenship.
  • Chris Taggart: Open data gives the ability to build tools to understand the world, in this case the corporate world, in which there is a huge gap of information: disparate sources, obscure information, lack of relational information, not reliable datasets…
  • Javier Saenz Core: Leadership and commitment from local council is a basic pre-requisite to build open data strategies
  • Raul Gonzalez: Benefits of open data: participation, improvement of transparency, shared knowledge, 24h access to applications, etc.
  • Joel Cherkis: Better government, transparency and civic engagement are the three main drivers of the open data movement
  • Kim Spiegelberg: Piloting by trial and error, approaching a strategy of “start small and aim big goals”
  • Ron Pernick: The key issue is that we are getting a level of clean technology mainstream, middle level.
  • Mark Van Stiphout: We think that to return to national approaches is a bad idea. We need to invest in solar energy wherever there is more solar energy, no where there are more subsidies. We have a pan-European approach.
  • Stephen Turner: Empowering people. People have to be able to manage the energy use.
  • Frederick Krimgold: The tendency is to contract external sources to take care of urban management, building a new type of collaboration between private sector and public administration.
  • Mirko Masi: A Resilient City requires a reliable communication infrastructure to reduce the impact of unexpected hazard or disasters and to increase the capacity to adapt and absorb the shock.
  • Roberto Urrea Ramírez: Cada día nos preparamos para analizar cada pequeño evento, la información resultante nos ayudará a prevenirnos en caso de un gran evento.
  • Yasser Helmy: When people use social media applications can report a lot of data so as to take decisions. The important thing is how to convert all this data in useful information.
  • Sergio Massa: El sistema educativo tiene el desafío de establecer un cambio en la capacitación y formación de docentes, asociado a la revolución tecnológica que estamos viviendo.
  • Helen Darbishire: The access to open data is not a new idea. According to the Humans Rights we all have the right to access to information, but also we have duties.
  • Alan Shark: Smart cities is more about journey than destination.
  • Peter Park: Rethink the major highways, with an object that return public investments in the form of private money
  • Adie Tomer: If we plan well transport financially, only then can we integrate technology of smart mobility.
  • Adrià Gomila: It is not about investing in new things, but about using existing technology more intelligently.
  • Briand Devlin: There are four key elements in a Smart city: health improvement, energy, transport and public safety. Our project in Glasgow includes integration systems, people organisations, innovation (which is difficult to do, it is not just about making smart apps), transparency and people.
  • Jung Hoon Lee: A comparison between Seoul and Barcelona as smart cities, shows Seaoul is more top down and centralised, whereas Barcelona is more bottom up with a strong support from the government.
  • Philipp Bouteiller: These topics are typically locked at in pillars but we don¿t want to do that. In Berlin we want to work on the many unsolved problems raised by smart cities, in energy, mobility, recycling and water, but also materials and IT, which are basic, it has to be a  cross cutting section.
  • Lluisa Marsal: The Smart Urban Planning Method, developed at the University of Girona is a  citizen centric approach ¿ the first urban initiative that includes all stakeholders, all possible actors of the city, involved: industry providing technology), governments and public bodies (provide legal framework), scientific community, and citizens.
  • James  Pace: Meshed m2m (machine to machine) scale brings disruptive economics. Network thinking first, if you can put your value proposition and understand your requirements you’ll come up with a coherent strategy. Most elements will be considered critical infrastructure.
  • Andrea Braeuning: Smart city is not about innovation of technology, not about connectivity in technological terms or segment specific approaches, it is about already exiting products, financing models beyond pilots, collaboration and new business structures.
  • María  Jesús Villamediana:  El Smart City o Smart Service necesita una retro alimentación, un feedback, de cómo lo percibe el cliente.
  • Kari Kankaala: Although it is called smart city , the city does not do everything, it is the citizens, public, universities, the individual,¿ but who governs it?
  • James Waring: If the government can set a high mark and get out of the way and let the marketplace respond, then you have the degree of innovation we are having in San Diego.
  • Richard Florida: The basic force behind growth is the clustering of people and technology together as an urban metabolism = the city. It is about megaregions such as Barcelona-Lyon / Amsterdam · Brussels · Antwerp; about functioning megaregions , A great functioning megaregion needs to be a Technology leader, promote Talent and be Tolerant. It is now about Quality of place not Quality of life. The city spurs innovation by serendipity.
  • Antoni Vives:It¿s time to promote a human development specifically designed for cities.
  • Pedro Paulo Carvalho: Para construir una ciudad smart primero tenemos que entrenar a nuestros lideres en temas de gestión para el futuro.
  • Charbel Aoun: It¿s not only about technology, it¿s not only about data.  It¿s about every aspect of the city.
  • Laura Ipsen: The real opportunity that we have today is the construction of the digital architecture of the future.
  • Mike Lake: Identify challenges, explore solutions, share experiences, all of these is important to develop smart cities.
  • Valmir Fachini:  Integrated biosystems try to imitate nature: energy generation through biomass disposal.
  • Eduardo Fernández: We have to be prepared to convert disposal into resources.
  • Ignacio Arespacochaga Maroto:  It¿s better to give a bonus to citizens in order to improve their environmental behaviour.
  • Assumpta Faiña: Waste is a twofold challenge in cities: from homes to wasteland and, sometimes less considered, from source to homes.
  • Eric Woods: Our cities need to use big data in order to manage cities accurately according to the complex challenges we face today in the information age.
  • Guy Danon: Good governance, user empowerment, community engagement, service information and urban resilience are the main urban pillars today to drive innovation.
  • Jordi Marin & Pablo Vázquez: The pulse of the city is basic information that has to be converted into meaningful knowledge to take decisions.
  • Hans Viehmann: Big data is, mostly, location information, such as where is something, how do I get somewhere, or today I am at…
  • Jarmo Eskelinen: Like the Wikipedia, citizens can also built something big.
  • Pedro Vidal Matamala: Nuestro primer paso, el más importante, es dar una mirada smart al interior de nuestra organización.
  • Liliana Jaimes: Buscamos crear una ciudad donde todo se encuentre integrado.
  • Jong Sung Hwang: Smart City means city as a platform.
  • Víctor Rico: Las ciudades son motor del desarrollo pero también han aumentado las desigualdades sociales.
  • Alexandra Vogl: We have to think global but be a smart local mobile, geo-spatial, and web 2.0 can help save money, reach citizens more effectively, and deliver better public services.
  • Colette Maloney: we need to integrate informatics, energy and ICT to improve our live in cities.
  • Magdalena Andrea Strachinescu: The idea is to find innovative solutions that we can transfer to other cities.
  • Juanjo Hierro: For smartcities we need technology and open innovation ecosystems.
  • Steve Turner: Manchester will be a showcase to the world of how to deliver strong economic growth and create a comfortable place to live, through a sustainable model.
  • Steffen Rasmussen: The way we learn it¿s very important for the way how we implant smart solutions.
  • Laszlo Bax: Simple ICT system can facilitate a choice of an optimal energy tariff
  • Luis Reis: The path to design a real time managing plan: define indicators,
  • integrate systems, incorporate externalities and involve users.
  • Antonio Marques: The challenge now is how to manage information to create social value so as to save energy.
  • Nicholas Brooke: Science park is poised to assume a central position in strengthening Hong Kon´s green culture.
  • Miguel Veríssimo: Using state of the art technologies you can design sustainable and smart cities.
  • Camilo Valdivia: Smart cities approach to (in)formal urban growth.
  • Stig L. Andersson: We must use nature¿s processes to enhance our cities.
  • Lluís Domènech: he most interesting projects developed with sustainability criteria and high technological standards are becoming models for transforming our cities.
  • Sergio Jerez: Opening data is not about being modern or fancy, it is about a new raw material for society and the need of more efficient services.
  • Annette Holm: Regulations can serve as an enabler of barriers for ICT deployment a digital society extension.
  • Brenna Berman: Data updating cannot depend on a manual routine, it won¿t be effective. Maintaining it as automatically as possible is the main suggestion we can share.
  • Jarmo Eskelinen: Internet is about scale and critical mass, how can these characteristics be replicated in cities’ nature?
  • Frank Kresen: We are stressing the benefits of technologies, but citizens do not trust them.
  • Jan Anneerstedt: Social activism has also been vital to imagine the way forward for 2020 and reformulate the city of Stockholm.
  • Matts lager: It is essential the long-term cooperation between the public and private sectors.
  • Emilio Fernández: A smart city is when services are offered intelligently improving the quality
  • Volker Buscher: Do cities want to be leaders or followers?
  • Francesc Robusté: So far we have shown that we can be smart without too much technology, now we have to prove we can be smart with technology.
  • Jean Louis Fiorucci: It¿s required an overview of mobility where traffic, transport, parking and people are connected concepts.
  • Maria Serrano we can identify three trends in mobility: Mobility Cooperative, Smart urban furniture and Smart Mobility more social.
  • Anthony Townsend: Open data, cheap cell phones, wifi can be pro-poor technologies for inclusion, but used in different ways from a civic hacking perspective.
  • Abha Joshi-Ghani: Participatory budgeting can now be fostered thanks to mobile technologies far more easily today than what it was years ago
  • Jong Sung Hwang: Smart city projects can be different in approach. Open and close networks are options that normally go together depending on our needs.
  • Peter Madden: Innovate collaboratively. No single organisation can tackle all the challenges of cities on their own.
  • Fernando Rayon: The challenge is to amplify the ability to create new products for consumers and collaborate with other institutions.
  • Iñigo de la Serna: Participatory sensing with mobile tools is enhancing citizen reporting and making it easier for public services to have better information of issues on streets and public spaces.
  • Alfonso Govela: Linking youth, technology and cities is a way to hear the sound of the city.
  • Norihiro Hagita: Field experimentations of robotic solutions at schools, shopping centres, health centers,…have become more and more usual and there is a reliable knowledge on these experiences.
  • David Johera: Creating scalable models is the only way to approach urban infrastructures integration instead of building one final platform from the start.
  • Zvica Popper: When designing a new service, system or product you have two alternatives: society driven innovation and technology driven innovation.
  • Eddie Bet Hazvadi: The cities are for the people who inhabit them. We believe that if a city cannot satisfy the needs of its inhabitants will not have good results. This approach requires holistic solutions.
  • Yanjing Wang: We want to create a market environment for technological aplications were smart solucions can be developed.
  • Oisín Quinn: Cities cannot wait for people to adapt to them, it must be the other way around: the city has to adapt to the people.
  • Carlos Negreira Souto: El ciudadano no puede estar al margen de los cambios que están ocurriendo.
  • Joanna Williams: It¿s necessary to use a mixed kind of policies in order to become a zero carbon city.
  • Thomas Rau: We have to produce and to consume in a completely different way.
  • Kurt Emil Eriksen: An active house creates healthier and more comfortable indoor conditions for its occupants.
  • Mihaela Thuring: Urban living lab concept: urban transition lab; urban citizen lab; urban learning lab.
  • Eric-Mark Huitema: Globalization has changed the economic playing field, but hasn’t leveled population growth in cities.
  • Guillermo Fernández: Queremos fomentar que las personas dejen sus coches en casa y se deplacen a pie.
  • Roman Gaus: There are a few big megatrends we are going to see in the next few years: food safety, traceability of food, consumer demand, urbanization, retail innovation, or food security. We know 20% of fresh produce consumed in the city could and should come from the city.
  • Ben Flanner  -Stormwater capture and energy insulation are the two main reasons for rooftop gardening, and it has a triple bottom-line: income, environmental benefits, and community benefits.
  • Pam Warhurst – We are using the power of food to change the way we live, converting our city center into the center of an edible revolution, bringing pride back to cities and their citizens.
  • Pablo Sánchez Chillón: La red española de ciudades inteligentes ha hecho hasta la actualidad un buen trabajo pero tiene tres retos: 1) bajar los proyectos a la ciudad real de forma escalable, 2) situar el discurso más allá de la élite vinculando a la ciudadanía y 3) mejorar la comunicación del trabajo realizado, un modelo exportable.
  • José Vicente Valdenebro: El problema de las ciudades es que antes de la creación de la red hemos trabajado de forma vertical. Actualmente somos capaces de aprender de los demás.
  • Beatriz Simon: La red española de ciudades inteligentes se formula desde un punto de vista muy aristotélico, es decir práctico.
  • Ángel Ibáñez Hernando: Otro reto de la red española de ciudades inteligentes debe ser la propia formalización del concepto de ciudad inteligente más allá del marketing y sacarle las cargas de rechazo (por la connotación pretenciosa o cursi del vocablo) de parte de la población.
  • Iñigo de la Serna:  El reto más importante de la red española de ciudades inteligentes es generar proyectos conjuntos, facilitar la regulación y promover lacolaboración público-privada.
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Human Development Index in the Top Ten U.S. Metro Areas

FireShot Screen Capture #048 - 'HDI Map' - www_measureofamerica_org_maps